CT (Computed Tomography)

In simplified terms, a CT is a type of xray. During CT, a thin beam of x-rays circles completely around the body, collecting a 360-degree view of the area being examined.

What is a CT?

In simplified terms, a CT is a type of xray. During CT, a thin beam of x-rays circles completely around the body, collecting a 360-degree view of the area being examined.

Detailed information about CT can be found at the American College of Radiology’s website RadiologyInfo.org

PET-CT-IQ

NAR is Offering a New CT Scanner - The Discovery IQ

What Does The Discovery IQ Offer

How do I prepare?

You may be asked to drink a special oral contrast material or plain water 1-2 hours before the exam to improve visualization of your intestines and or be given an IV injection of Iodinated contrast material during your exam.

Please inform your referring Doctor before your scan if you have any allergy to Iodinated Contrast material so accommodations can be made or an alternate test be considered. Patients who have diabetes or renal disease require special care because the kidneys are involved in filtering the iodine from the bloodstream. These patients should consult with their physician about proper scheduling of the CT scan.

You should wear comfortable, loose-fitting clothing for your CT exam. Metal objects can affect the image, so avoid clothing with zippers and snaps. You may also be asked to remove hairpins, jewelry, eyeglasses, hearing aids and any removable dental work, depending on the part of the body that is being scanned. You may be asked to change into a gown.

What should I expect during the exam?

A board certified Registered CT Technologist will perform your exam. Before the exam the technologist will explain the procedure to you and answer any questions that you may have. Some exams require an IV catheter be placed in your vein to allow an Iodine based contrast agent to circulate through your body during the scan. The contrast material improves the visualization of organs and other structures within the body.  If receiving the IV contrast during your scan you can expect to feel a warm flushing sensation within your body and possibly a metallic taste or smell.  These sensations are normal and only last for a moment.  During the scan you may be asked to hold your breath for 20 seconds or less and be told to remain still during the scans.

How long will it take?

You should allow approximately 30 minutes for the exam, although most of that time is in preparation. The amount of time the machine is actually scanning is usually only a minute or two.

What if I am pregnant?

You should definitely inform both your doctor and the technologist if you are pregnant. Under most circumstances, CTs should NOT be performed on pregnant women do to the risk of radiation exposure to the baby. Your doctor may consult with the radiologist to determine if another study would be more appropriate for you.

Are there any limitations after the exam?

No. You may return to your normal activities, unless instructed otherwise by your doctor.

Is the exam safe?

Generally yes, but you should be aware of several risks.

CT Exam Preps

IV Contrast exam No food or drink except medications 3 hours prior to exam.
IV Contrast exam No food or drink except medications 3 hours prior to exam.
  • CT Abdomen only – 16 oz of water 30 minutes before your exam
  • CT Pelvis only – 32 oz of water 1 hour before your exam
  • CT Abdomen and Pelvis – 32 oz of water 1 hour before your exam
  • CT Abdomen and Pelvis Enterography – please speak with a scheduler for specific dietary and oral prep instructions
No food or drink except medications 3 hours prior to exam.
  • Head
  • Sinus/Temporal bones/Facial bones
  • Any extremity
  • Spine
  • Chest
  • Abdomen and or pelvis

How do I get the results?

A radiologist will review and interpret the images from your exam. He or she will provide a written report to your referring physician which includes a description of the findings, any diagnosis that can be made from the exam, and a recommendation for further studies, if needed. Reports are usually available within 24 hours of completion of the examination, and are generally received by your physician within two working days. A report may be delayed if we are awaiting studies from an outside facility for comparison purposes. If the results are urgent or if you are seeing your doctor on the same day as your exam, your doctor may request that a preliminary report be phoned or faxed.

Do you have any questions?

We understand that people looking for various exams may have a lot of questions, please do not hesitate to contact us so that we can walk with you during this trying time.