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  • Northern Arizona Radiology News

    Stay up to date with the most relevant information regarding Radiology and the future of Nuclear Medicine.

Bone Density QCT

DEXA and Bone Density

Bone Density QCT

We don’t often think of bones as tissue, but our bones are actually a type of connective tissue, the most common tissue in the human body. Cartilage, bone marrow and blood are also types of connective tissue. In addition to making blood cells (red blood cells, white blood cells and platelets) our bones are so important because they basically hold us together, protect vital organs and allow us to move efficiently.

As with any other human structure, bones can develop problems that may seriously impact our health. The most common bone diseases is osteoporosis, a condition that happens when we lose too much bone, don’t make enough bone, or a combination of both.

Pain Awareness Month

Lower Back Pain

Pain Awareness Month

Established in 2001 by the American Chronic Pain Association, September marks National Pain Month in the U.S. One of the most common sources of pain is the lower back, and according to the National Institutes of health, about 80 percent of us experience low back pain at some point in our lives. Low back pain is also the most common cause of job-related disability and a leading contributor to missed workdays.

Two major causes of low back pain are radiculopathy (better known as sciatica) and spinal stenosis. A visit to your health care professional is the first step in dealing with low back pain and getting a proper diagnosis.

Low back pain can sometimes be treated with exercise, physical therapy and, in some cases, medication. For difficult low back pain problems – including sciatica, spinal stenosis, and pain in nearby joints – epidural (near the spinal cord) injection of steroidal painkillers may be used. These pain injections fall into an area of medical practice called interventional radiology.

Radiologists Stick to Yearly

Mammograms Starting at Age 40

Radiologists Stick to Yearly

As radiologists, we’re often asked if we’d recommend the same exams to our friends, family or even ourselves if we were in the patient’s shoes. When it comes to recommending annual screening mammograms for women aged 40 and over, the answer from radiologists is a resounding “Yes.”

A study published in the June online edition of the American Journal of Roentgenology surveyed 487 breast radiologists about their mammography screening recommendations. The radiologists were asked about which exams they recommended to their average-risk patients, friends and family; they were further asked if those recommendations were consistent with how they would care for themselves if they were the patient.

Throughout Arizona

The Northern Arizona Radiology offices are conveniently located on the first floor of the Physicians and Surgeons Building, just north of the hospital on the SE corner of Forest Ave and Beaver St. Free on-site parking is available. Please be aware that there are three (3) NAR offices. Check-in at the suite appropriate for the exam you are having performed. See below.

Suite 101, to the right as you enter the building: Mammography, Women’s Ultrasound, & Breast Biopsies

Suite 105, down the hall on the right as you enter the building: MRI

Suite 102, just to the left as you enter the building: X-Ray, General Ultrasound, CT, PET/CT, Bone Densitometry, Nuclear Medicine & Interventional procedures

Office Hours

Monday – Friday 8:30 am – 5:00 pm
Saturdays & Sundays by Scheduled Appointment.